Keynote speakers

Keynote speakers and plenary sessions

1. Fiona Bull, World Health Organization – Current practices and issues in physical activity promotion: From small-scale interventions to changes in national policy

Professor Fiona Bull
Professor Fiona Bull

Professor Fiona Bull is a Program Manager at Surveillance & Population Based Prevention, Prevention of Noncommunicable Diseases (PND), World Health Organization (WHO). She was Director of the Centre for Built Environment and Health at The University of Western Australia and President of the International Society for Physical Activity and Health. Prior to this she worked at Loughborough University in the UK, the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, USA, and at the WHO, Geneva.

Professor Bull’s research is focussed on promotion of healthy active living and the prevention of chronic disease, and combines her background in public health, exercise science, physical activity and education. Her work includes physical activity measurement and surveillance, understanding individual, social and environmental determinants and developing and testing programs and policy interventions.

Professor Bull has a strong focus on application and she seeks to translate research into practical solutions and policy by working closely with industry partners and in a multi-disciplinary collaboration team. Recent work on public open space (www.postool.com.au) has won three industry awards in 2013/2014. She has extensive experience in national and international research collaborations and is the lead author of the Toronto Charter for Physical Activity: A global call to action and Seven Investments – what works. To date, Professor Bull has over 160 scientific publications, book chapters and reports and in 2014 her contribution to research and policy was recognised with the award of an MBE.

2. Susan Michie, University College London, UK – Applying behavioural science to developing and evaluating digital interventions: implications for physical activity

Professor Susan Michie
Professor Susan Michie

Susan Michie, BA, MPhil, DPhil, CPsychol, AcSS, FEHPsS, FBPsS is Professor of Health Psychology and Director of the Centre for Behaviour Change at University College London, UK.

She studied Experimental Psychology and completed a DPhil in Developmental Psychology at Oxford University and clinical psychology training at the Institute of Psychiatry, London University. She is a chartered clinical and health psychologist, and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences, the European Health Psychology Society (EHPS) and the British Psychological Society (BPS). She is Past President of the EHPS and Past Chair of the BPS’s Division of Health Psychology. She is an NIHR Senior Investigator and leads part of UK’s School for Public Health Research.  Current editorial responsibilities include Associate Editor of Annals of Behavioral Medicine and of Implementation Science.

Susan Michie’s research focuses on behaviour change in relation to health: how to understand it theoretically and apply theory to intervention development, evaluation and implementation, and to evidence synthesis. Her research investigating innovative methods for developing, evaluating and implementing behavioural interventions is conducted in three main health domains: risk factors amongst the general population (e.g. smoking, excessive alcohol consumption), managing long-term conditions (e.g. diabetes) and professional practice.

Websites:
www.ucl.ac.uk/health-psychology/people/Susan_Michie
www.ucl.ac.uk/behaviour-change
Twitter:
@SusanMichie

 

3. Zeljko Pedisic, Victoria University, Australia – Issues and challenges in physical activity surveillance

Željko Pedišić, PhD
Željko Pedišić, PhD
Željko Pedišić, PhD is a Senior Research Fellow and leader of the Active Living & Public Health Group at the Institute of Sport, Exercise & Active Living (ISEAL), Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.

His academic career started at the University of Zagreb where he worked for nine years as a methodological consultant and senior lecturer in statistics and theory of measurement. Before joining Victoria University, he worked as a postdoctoral research fellow at the Institute of Sport Science, Karl-Franzens University of Graz and at the Prevention Research Collaboration, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sydney. He is the Coordinator of the Victoria University Public Health Network (VUPHN).

He is the author of the Activity Balance Model (AB Model), a theoretical framework suggesting that, instead of being treated as independent risk factors, sleep, sedentary behaviour, quiet standing, and physical activity should be analysed as parts of a time-use composition using compositional data analysis. A key part of his research also concerns methodological aspects of physical activity and sedentary behaviour measurement, particularly the use of questionnaires and accelerometers in physical activity surveillance.

Websites:
www.vu.edu.au/contact-us/zeljko-pedisic
www.researchgate.net/profile/Zeljko_Pedisic
Twitter:
@Zeljko_Pedisic

 

4. Gregory J. Welk, Iowa State University, USA – The use of wearable technologies in measurement and promotion of physical activity

Professor Gregory J. Welk
Professor Gregory J. Welk
Gregory J. Welk is a Professor in the Department of Kinesiology at Iowa State University. He completed his MS degree at the University of Iowa and his Ph.D. at Arizona State University. Dr. Welk’s research interests focus on the assessment and promotion of physical activity and fitness and the work is coordinated through the Physical Activity and Health Promotion that he manages within the Department of Kinesiology.

He has conducted numerous studies on the reliability, validity and utility of different physical activity assessment techniques but an emphasis has been on the use of accelerometry-based activity monitors. He has built established lines of research with both research grade and consumer based monitors and has linked this work to new lines of behavioral research focused on facilitated health coaching applications that incorporate feedback from monitors.

He has worked on applications to facilitate the effective application of these methods in community and clinical settings. His presentation will summarize his recent work on the use of wearable technologies in both the assessment and promotion of physical activity.